Historic Preservation Course at Washington University

This fall, the University College at Washington University is offering “Introduction to Historic Preservation” (SUST 315) as part of the curriculum for its Sustainability major and its Sustainable Communities certificate.  Anyone can enroll, however, so spread the word.  Preservation architect Jeff Brambila, former president of Missouri Preservation and   current board member of Landmarks Association of St. Louis, teaches the course.

Here is the description:

This course explores the history and practice of historic preservation with an emphasis on regional urban issues and the way in which historic preservation contributes toward the development of sustainable communities. Students are exposed to a diverse range of preservation topics that will enable them to apply sound historic preservation principles in professional practice. Course topics include: evaluation and recording of historic properties and districts; Secretary of the Interior’s standards in the process of planning or designing a project; historic preservation in community planning; application process for state and federal tax credit programs; conservation of historic building materials; historic preservation vs. modern building codes and user requirements. We examine case studies of completed projects or projects in progress.

Registration information is available on the University College site here; search for “introduction to historic preservation.”

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2 Responses to Historic Preservation Course at Washington University

  1. Douglas Duckworth says:

    Jeff is a cool guy. Hopefully lots of students take the course!

  2. Ed Golterman says:

    I don’t know Jeff but I can teach his students how to win,
    how to save buildings rather than ‘fight the good fight’-nice try. And I’ve written the book that is their learning guide.

    But it takes them into the real word, not the academic and
    p;rocedureal world. And the real world is tough, very tough.

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