Category Archives: Old North

Cities Change, But Big Projects Remain the Same

by Michael R. Allen The dean of New York history, Kenneth T. Jackson, recently published a salvo in the New York Times intended to advance the argument that New York’s neighborhood preservation movement was stifling the city’s chance to build … Continue reading

Posted in Cherokee Street, Historic Preservation, Old North, Shaw | 10 Comments

The Sisyphean Footsteps of Northside Regeneration

by Michael R. Allen Recently I read a newspaper article about a major urban development project that included these two sentences: “He received hundreds of millions of dollars in public cash and incentives. But after a long public review process, … Continue reading

Posted in JeffVanderLou, North St. Louis, Northside Regeneration, Old North, St. Louis Place | 16 Comments

Questions for Northside Regeneration

by Michael R. Allen The Missouri Supreme Court’s unanimous ruling issued yesterday affirming the Northside Regeneration redevelopment ordinances means “we’re open for business,” in the words of company leader Paul J. McKee, Jr. Of course since Circuit Court Judge Robert … Continue reading

Posted in James Clemens House, North St. Louis, Northside Regeneration, Old North, St. Louis Place | 5 Comments

Sustainable Land Lab Winners Revealed Next Week

by Michael R. Allen In St. Louis, vacant land is a huge problem. Yet the details are small: a single lot here, a moribund city-owned red-brick house there, or a dead gas station down the block. As the city struggles … Continue reading

Posted in Abandonment, Events, Old North | 1 Comment

Seven Lost Buildings in Old North

by Michael R. Allen Last month my friend Emily Hemeyer invited me to contribute to a sprawling, wood-made installation called the Migratory Hive Project. The Migratory Hive Project was exhibited outdoors in Columbia, Missouri during the annual True/False Film Festival, … Continue reading

Posted in Abandonment, Demolition, North St. Louis, Old North | 2 Comments

The Cost of Northside Regeneration

In my latest St. Louis Public Radio commentary, “The Cost of Northside Regeneration”, I contrast the slow development of the St. Louis Place neighborhood after John O’Fallon and others filed the Union Addition plat in 1850 with the lumbering, subsidized … Continue reading

Posted in North St. Louis, Northside Regeneration, Old North, Public Policy, St. Louis Place, Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Step Away From the “Like” Button And Write A Check Already: Brickstarting a Rehab in Old North

by Emily Kozlowski Here is a chance to actively participate in preserving a part of St. Louis. Old North Saint Louis Restoration Group (ONSLRG) recently bought this three-story, brick structure at 1316 North Market from the Land Reutilization Authority (LRA). … Continue reading

Posted in Historic Preservation, Housing, North St. Louis, Old North | 2 Comments

This Building Matters #1: 1914 & 1916 Palm Street, Old North

Preservation Research Office is pleased to present the first episode of a regular video series called This Building Matters. The premise is simple: Preservation is something lots of of people care about and practice in their daily lives. This series … Continue reading

Posted in North St. Louis, Old North, This Building Matters | 3 Comments

Sustainable Land Lab Competition First Phase Submission Due December 10

Led by Washington University in St. Louis, the Sustainable Land Lab kicked off with an event on Friday, November 2 at the Contemporary Art Museum. (By the way, Ron Sims’ moving talk from the kick-off is now available on the … Continue reading

Posted in Abandonment, North St. Louis, Old North, Planning | 1 Comment

One Building For An Extra Lane

by Michael R. Allen This is the former Greyhound maintenance building (built around 1950) at the northeast corner of Cass Avenue and Hadley Street, currently being demolished by the Missouri Department of Transportation (MODOT). While the building’s loss has been … Continue reading

Posted in Clearance, Demolition, North St. Louis, Old North | 4 Comments